Facts & Figures

Population

Both Chile and Germany are pioneers of renewable energy in their respective region of the world. Accordingly, both countries have set off for a socially sustainable carbon phase-out.

Chile
19.1
million
Germany
83
million

Sources: INE, Destatis
 

GDP per Capita

Chile, being the first Latin American country to have joined the OECD, faces the opportunity to foster a growing middle class and fulfil its commitment towards a green economy. Germany is part of the G20, the group of the larger developed and developing countries, while Chile has gained itself a status as permanent guest invitee. This creates areas of joint efforts on the international stage, such as promoting the energy transition and protecting the climate.

Chile
23500
EURO
Germany
47500
EURO

Total Final Energy Consumption

Both countries are important energy producers, but still heavily rely on the import of fossil fuels on a large scale. Chile´s import quota for primary energy is around 70%. Just like Germany however, it has a steady increase of renewables in its energy production. One of Chile´s biggest assets for the future is its potential of over 1,800 GW in clean power.

Chile
1118
Petajoule
Germany
9503
Petajoule

Source: IEA (2018)

CO2 emissions per capita

Chile greenhouse emissions per capita are about half of Germany´s. However, the South American country is very vulnerable to extreme consequences of climate change. Both partners promote decarbonization. Germany and Chile strongly support the Paris Agreement. There is a clear interest in supporting the reduction of GHG emissions, particularly in the energy sector. As both economies expand, the two countries are cooperating at the international stage to promote mitigation and a transformation of energy systems.

Chile
4.68
t CO2 per capita
Germany
8.42
t CO2 per capita

Source: IEA (2018)

 

Share of RES generation (of gross electricity generation)

Germany is among the leading countries of renewable energy generation. Despite the size of its economy, Germany has managed to steadfastly increase its renewable electricity generation. The integration of increasing shares of variable renewable energy sources into the power grid is an example of lessons learned that Germany is sharing with Chile.

Likewise, Chile has been rapidly increasing its renewable energy generation in the past years. The country harbours enormous renewable energy potential. Crucial energy reforms have set the institutional and regulatory basis for the energy transition, facilitating private investments.

Chile
44 %
(provisional data)
Germany
42.6 %

Sources (2019)

Chile: Coordinador, Energia Abierta, Acera

Germany: BMWi, AEE, Agora

Renewable power capacity per capita

Germany is number one of all countries in terms of installed renewable energy capacity per capita. Chile has shown fast growth in recent years.

Chile
0.6
kW
Germany
1.4
kW

Sources: REN 21 / own calculations

Clean Energy Goals for 2050

Both Germany and Chile have set themselves ambitious 2050 goals for the transformation of their power sectors. While Chile’s 2050 goal includes large-scale hydropower that is already in operation, the country’s expansion targets mainly focus on non-conventional renewables. The Latin country will have reached 20% NCRE by the end of 2019. (An interim goal for 2035 is a 60% share, including large hydropower.) In Germany, electricity supply should be at least 80 percent renewable by 2050. There are also intermediate targets of 35% to 40% share by 2025 and 55% to 60% by 2035.

Chile
70 %
Non Conventional Renewables
Germany
80 %
Non Conventional Renewables

Source: BMWi (2017); ME (2015)

Chile: Energy 2050

Germany: EEF 2017 - German Renewable Energy Sources Act 2017  

ES